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MIT Researchers Develop "Smart Surface" That Could Improve Your WiFi Signal

MIT Researchers Develop



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Poor WiFi signal is the fifth horsemen of the apocalypse, and you probably had enough problems with it that are enough for a lifetime. We’ve all struggled with getting those 2 bars up to an acceptable 4 while straining our arm to the farthest it can go. In situations where your router is not meeting your desires, you can always use mesh networks and WiFi boosters, however, a team of researchers at MIT CSAIL had other ideas.

These researchers developed RFocus, which works as a smart surface which can help boost WiFi signal by as high as tenfold.

SEE ALSO: IS IT POSSIBLE FOR YOU TO BE ALLERGIC TO WI-FI?

Thanks to this new technology, it might become possible for you to stick these surfaces around the house to boost your internet. These smart surfaces will act as a mirror or a lens to focus wireless signals to their respective devices. This means that you won't have to look at the "loading" page any longer.

How they work is quite simple: a smart surface can work both as a mirror or a lens to focus radio signals onto the right devices. By doing so, it increases the median signal strength by nearly 10 times, while doubling the median channel capacity in an office environment.

In addition to easy usage, it will probably be relatively cheap. According to the estimations, such a setup could probably cost you a few cents per antenna. Another bright side is that it would consume less power compared to conventional systems.

While it is unclear when the researchers will commercialize the technology, it is certainly good news for people who have to work with bad internet.


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